The 70,237 Project. I had no idea.

The 70,237 project was started by Jeanne Hewell-Chambers.  I encourage you to go to her site and read about this project.  Below is an excerpt (italics).  When you go to her site and look around you will see people all across the world participating.  You will see that these quilts get shown all across the world.  Just glance through all the blog posts.

For some reason with all the craziness going on in our world today, this project struck me as something I needed to do.  Being that quilters are some of the most generous people I know, I wanted to share in case there might be even one more person out there who would like to participate.  On October 14th (see Global Block day Below), Haley and I will make a few more blocks and send them in.

block partyThey are having A #GLOBALBLOCKDAY on October 14th.  The last blog post I read had between 20k and 30k completed.  There is still a lot to be done.

It won’t take much of your time.  I made the 5 above in less than about 45 minutes from scraps.

We (The 70,237 project) are gathering 70,273 blocks of fabric, marked with two red crosses to commemorate the number of physically and mentally disabled men, women and children who were murdered between January 1940 and August 1941 in the Aktion T4 Programme – a largely unrecognized atrocity.  

The two red crosses represent the marks made by the assessing Doctors as to whether the person was deemed ‘unfit’ or an economic burden on Nazi society. It is such a simple symbol, and in this project, the simplicity with which someone could sign someone’s life away is turned into a symbol of love and strength. The white fabric represents the medical records – the only information assessing physicians used in making their life-and-death determinations. Seeing the crosses stitched together sends a powerful message of tolerance, community and love. Its impact comes from the huge variety of these two red marks – each beautiful in their own perfectly imperfect way.
The blocks will be stitched into quilts and wall hangings and will be displayed in Rochester, Lincoln and Durham Cathedrals during January 2018, to mark National Holocaust Memorial Day. After that, these quilts will join others made around the world to appear in exhibits near and far. 

Happy Sewing

Happy Quilting

#GLOBALBLOCKDAY

 

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A Sentimental Blast from the Past

In July, the quilt guild is having a garage sale for quilting fabric/items.  I was going through some boxes looking for things I could part with (more like make room for more) and came across this embroidered item.

Right away it brought tears to my eyes.  I made this from a kit that Oma sent me from Germany.  She knew I was crafty and often sent me something she knew I would like to do.  She also sent me a piece of silverware for my collection.  I so remember looking at that silver fork and looking at my mother wondering why I always got silverware from her on my birthday and at the holidays (along with the crafty items).  My mother would always tell me that I will appreciate it later.  While I hated getting utensils as a present when I was a kid, Mom was right.  I certainly do appreciate it now.  I have an entire set of silver for 12.  It is something I truly cherish.  Every holiday I think of her and my mother when I get it out.

Since Oma died when I was in my late teens, I imagine this piece is pretty old.  Maybe 40 years or close to it.  Once I ironed it, it was perfect.  Originally I think it was made to hang on your front door.  I may still do that, but not until I add something quilty.    I am thinking it needs to be colorful, hot pinks, oranges, lime greens.  Not sure of design yet, but I may keep it simple so not to take away from the embroidery and Oma’s memory.

Tomorrow I am going to a quilt in.  Yeah.  Can’t wait to spend the day with my friend Lynn doing what we love.

Happy Sewing

Happy Quilting

Treasure Your Family

Monnie’s Treasures

Monnie was my grandmother. She was one of my favorite people. She taught me how to sew. They lived in Dearborn Michigan and we went to visit them a lot. I loved going there. They had a wonderful house (that I still dream about to this day) and always had everything a kid could want (mostly candy and a fridge full of Pop).

Monnie used to get fabric samples from Blair’s Clothing. They were little swatches maybe 1” x 2” to try and get you to buy their clothes. She saved them for me. I would sit at her sewing machine and sew all these little pieces of fabric together in one big long strip. I think this might have been the beginning of my quilting habit, even though I didn’t realize it.

Monnie was an excellent seamstress. When I went to Kindergarten, she made all my clothes. I remember when her and Grandad brought them down to our house and I had to try them all on. Funny, I remember not wanting to. I wish I had some of those clothes today. They would mean so much. But, I will have to settle for one of her quilts.

When I look at this quilt, I am not often sure what I am looking at. Sometimes I see Cubes, sometimes I see stars in the design. This was a quilt that was used every day. It was used at her house and then somehow wound up at our house and my mother used it. I have several of Monnie’s quilts. Monnie was Uncle Donald’s sister(See my post about Uncle Donald’s quilt) , so quilting is a family thing.

Funny thing,  about many of Monnie’s quilts was that a piece of a sheet was sewn across the bottom, so you could tuck it in at the base of the bed. I am pretty sure that this was the cause of my sheet tucking obsession. I must have the sheets tucked in at the bottom. I can’t stand if a foot comes out. Maybe this is a family thing too.

I love the quilt. I find it beautiful, but mostly because she made it. I hold her responsible for my quilting/sewing obsession. Thank you Monnie. I miss you dearly.
Happy Quilting

Happy Sewing

Treasure your Family

Needlepoint: Young Girl Reading…A treasure

My mother was from Germany. She had some dear friends that owned a furniture store. They gave my mother several of these beautiful needlepoints.

If I remember correctly, they were made by women in the Black Forest. I can’t imagine the amount of time that it took to make such a piece. It is about 24” x 36”. The face and hands are done in petit point, which is so tiny. But, it shows such detail.

This beautiful piece hangs in my dining room. My research tells me that this is made from a painting titled “Young Girl Reading”. Originally it was done as an oil painting on canvas by Jean-Honore Gragonard. It currently hangs at the National Gallery of Art. It was believed to be painted in 1776. It is one of the many treasured items I have from my mother.

My mother brought back several of these needlepoints. I believe each of my three sisters have one or two. I have many beautiful items from Germany. I am sure you will get a chance to see them along the way.